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Addressing Chronic Homelessness: Ward & City Updates
July 28th, 2022

Dear Neighbor,

I met Pat (name changed for privacy) long before I was elected as the 46th Ward Alderman. Ever the colorful character, he loved dressing up like Michael Jackson, red leather jacket and all, and through the years, he would change his look to conform to whichever singer he liked at the time. Pat had lived with schizophrenia his entire adult life and relied upon nursing home care for many years. Pat later moved to a nearby apartment with wraparound services to help him maintain his independence but unfortunately, it didn’t last long. He had difficulty managing his incontinence which caused his apartment floor to get heavily damaged, and that led to his eviction. He then moved into another apartment but was soon evicted again for the same reason. 

After Pat’s last eviction, he started living on the streets. Now requiring the use of a walker, he would seek refuge in bus shelters to sleep at night. It was one of these nights in the dead of winter that I saw Pat. It was clear from his uncontrollable shivering that he needed a warm place for the night or he would freeze to death. I convinced him to allow me to get him into a shelter, and after that I didn’t see him around the neighborhood until a few months later. Pat was once again dressed as one of his favorite singers, and when I spoke with him, he would answer back in his gruff voice that he only wanted a few things: a cigarette, some food, and a bus shelter to lay down in for sleep. It was clear he needed much more, but Pat had given up on asking for much. I discussed Pat’s situation with numerous city departments, police, and different social service agencies, but Pat kept refusing services offered to him, which highlights the problem: Pat’s health continued to deteriorate but without the needed reminders to take his medication, he became less and less able to recognize that he needed a lot more help. 

This past winter, Pat was found frozen to death inside a bus shelter a block away from my home. Pat was one of those people who kept falling through the cracks in the very system designed to help him. 

For many people like Pat who are experiencing chronic homelessness due to a severe mental illness, there are multiple factors that can keep them from accepting offers for wraparound services and shelter: 

  • Distrust with the systems in place due to prior evictions or failed interactions 
  • Possible alcohol and/or substance use disorder
  • Poor adherence to psychiatric medication (the longer they go without taking their medication, the more difficult it will be for them to gain insight into their dilemma)
  • Other factors, i.e. bed bugs, incontinence, a pet, an unmarried partner, or no storage locker to keep their many belongings safe and secure

Pat’s story is one of many. The issue of chronic homelessness continues in Chicago and across this country. Around 20% of individuals experiencing homelessness are like Pat: stuck living on the streets, some for many years. They tend to be individuals who go in and out of hospital emergency departments and jail. 

FINDING SOLUTIONS TO ADDRESSING CHRONIC HOMELESSNESS
We know that a housing-first model provides the greatest amount of dignity and opportunity for individuals to transition from chronic homelessness to stable long-term housing. Studies have also shown that it is much more cost effective to house someone experiencing chronic homelessness with wraparound services than to have them live on the streets for a prolonged period of time, where the cost of their health care alone quadruples. By providing the necessary interventions and tweaking them to address issues as they surface, people like Pat won’t feel like their only option is to sleep inside a bus shelter or a viaduct at night. The best way for us to address chronic homelessness in our communities is to look at the outliers and extreme cases, such as Pat’s, and create a set of effective interventions that we can later apply to similar cases. We can then create system-wide solutions to ensure these processes are successful for everyone experiencing homelessness.  

ADDRESSING HOMELESSNESS IN THE 46TH WARD
As we have highlighted in previous newsletters, our office has continued to coordinate with various social service agencies and City departments on providing resources and housing for those experiencing homelessness. If you see someone experiencing homelessness, you can guarantee they are receiving outreach by calling our office so that we can ensure the Department of Family and Support Services (DFSS) outreach team is aware of them.

Trilogy Behavioral Health and Thresholds have secured state funding for mobile crisis teams to be dispatched in the 60657, 60640, and 60613 area codes. If you observe a person (or are a person) experiencing a mental health crisis, you can call either Trilogy or Threshold’s hotline or 988, to have a crew of social workers go out to engage them. Many individuals experiencing a mental health crisis tend to also be experiencing chronic homelessness. Trilogy and Thresholds mobile crisis teams have the ability to follow up with individuals and connect them to wrap-around services and supportive housing. 

HOW YOU CAN HELP

  • If you know of someone in need of shelter for the night, call 311 to request a pickup for shelter placement. 
  • Call the Trilogy and Thresholds Hotline numbers to connect individuals to mobile crisis teams. 
    • Trilogy Behavioral Health Hotline: 1-800-322-8400
    • Thresholds Hotline: 1-773-572-5464
  • Another way to help is by supporting the case manager's role of being the lead support for their client. Instead of providing food and other items directly, support has been more successful when items and money are donated to the person's assigned social service agency. Contact the 46th Ward Office (Ward46@cityofchicago.org or call 773-878-4646) to learn more about what agencies need. 

46TH WARD MICROGRANT PROGRAM
As we have announced in earlier newsletters, our office has allocated all of our $100,000 2022 Microgrant Program toward innovative pilot programs to support residents experiencing chronic homelessness. Three organizations received funding and the pilot programs are active and ongoing in the 46th Ward. All of the grant recipients are coordinating with our office and DFSS and are also required to collect and assess data on which interventions and strategies have been most effective in transitioning individuals to stable shelter and/or housing. I will be using this data to advocate for increased homelessness support funding during the upcoming budget season in October.

ADDRESSING HOMELESSNESS IN THE CITY OF CHICAGO
During the pandemic, Chicago received $35M in CARES Act funding that helped quickly house 1,766 individuals and families. There were over 60 accelerated moving events held at shelters or near encampments to assist people with transitioning into housing. In addition, over 4,446 apartment units have been identified to assist with the provision of housing for this vulnerable population.

The City of Chicago is also using federal funds to both relocate and renovate homeless shelters to move away from the congregate shelter model (one large room with many beds). This is especially important because COVID-19 pandemic distancing showed us that a non-congregate shelter setting (small rooms more suitable for an individual or family) left residents feeling safer and more engaged with service providers which led to increased housing placements and long-term success. 
  • $30M will be used to purchase motels throughout the city to turn them into shelters with private rooms. 
  • $40M will be used to renovate existing shelter facilities, which will include rehabbing shelters from being a congregate setting to a non-congregate shelter. 
NEW PROGRAM ESTABLISHED TO ADDRESS CHRONIC HOMELESSNESS
$12M has been allocated for a stabilization housing program for individuals with complex health conditions (such as untreated serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and co-occurring disorders) who cycle frequently though emergency rooms, jail, 911 services, and the shelter system. This program, through the Chicago Department of Public Health, is anticipated to start in early 2023, and it’s my hope that this program will successfully help people like Pat who kept falling through the cracks.

MOVING FORWARD WITH BETTER SOLUTIONS FOR ENCAMPMENTS
When the City Council first adopted a plan to address homelessness back in 2003, the common complaint was that the area social services, City departments, Cook County Jail, Cook County, and the State of Illinois were all working in silos independent of one another. The call back then was to get all the players coordinating and collaborating with one another to address the very complex issue of homelessness. When I was first elected in 2011, I also learned that the City of Chicago was funding interventions (how many cups of soup that had been given out or how many people stayed in a shelter) rather than funding programs for their outcomes (getting people into stable housing within a set timeframe). 

Developed in consultation with HUD, the Dept. of Justice, the VA, the Center for Disease Control, and several national partners dedicated to addressing homelessness, the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness created 7 principles to help each city craft their own solutions to encampments: 

Those principles are:
  1. Establish a cross-agency, multi-sector response
  2. Engage encampment residents to develop solutions
  3. Conduct comprehensive and coordinated outreach
  4. Address basic needs and provide storage
  5. Ensure access to shelter or housing options
  6. Develop pathways to permanent housing and supports
  7. Create a plan for what will happen to encampment sites after closure
As your alderman, I will continue to push the City of Chicago to rely on these other best practices already being used around the country because they are demonstrating great success. The first principle is the most difficult because it forces all the parties involved (people living in the encampments, activists, area residents who have expressed concerns about the blocked walkways under the viaducts, elected officials, social services, area businesses, CPD, and DFSS) to all work together to forge solutions. It’s tough to do because it forces people with differing opinions to work together to forge real solutions that produce real results. The good news is when I pushed for this approach back in 2017, we successfully housed 96 people living under the Uptown viaducts who had been stuck in the cycle of homelessness. I believe we can do it again if we remain focused on following through with all 7 principles laid out by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness.  As your alderman, I will keep pushing for the full implementation of this model of care that has a proven track record.

Pat’s story continues to stick with me and those that knew him. Let’s all work together to honor Pat’s memory and ensure that future individuals in the cycle of chronic homelessness get the help they not only need, but the help they deserve.

     Best,


 
MEET WITH ALD. JAMES CAPPLEMAN
SPEAK WITH ALDERMAN CAPPLEMAN EVERY TUESDAY 
Virtual office hours are every Tuesday from 3PM - 5PM via Zoom or phone. Sign up by the end of day Monday at 5:00 PM by emailing the office at Ward46@cityofchicago.org. If this time period does not work for you, contact the Ward Office to schedule another time.

SCHEDULE A ZOOM MEETING WITH YOUR COMMUNITY GROUP
Ald. Cappleman or a staff member is also available to meet with your local neighborhood or business organization to provide updates about what's happening locally or city-wide. East Lake View Neighbors, Triangle Neighbors, Buena Park Neighbors, Sheridan Park Neighbors Association, Beacon Block Club, and Uptown United all do this on a regular basis. Schedule a time by either email at Ward46@cityofchicago.org or call 773-878-4646.
845 W WILSON MURAL: CALL FOR COMMUNITY FEEDBACK
Email andybellomo222@gmail.com, fill out the survey here.
FILMING NOTICE
Please note that simulated gunfire will be used during filming. For additional questions, please contact the City of Chicago Film Office at 312-744-6415. 


988 HOTLINE FOR MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS SUPPORT
Call 988 for life-saving support and resources for people experiencing a mental health crisis.

CDPH UPDATE: MONKEYPOX & HEALTH CENTER SUPPORT
Scan the QR code or click here to find more information. 
UPCOMING EVENTS
BEZAZIAN LIBRARY
Saturday, July 30, 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. 1226 W. Ainslie. Friends of Bezazian Branch Library is collecting all types of books, plus CDs and DVDs, for our big autumn book sale. Books your kids have outgrown? Cookbooks you'll never use? Old textbooks? Whodunits that you've already solved? They accept all of them. Help keep books out of landfills and support the public library at the same time!

2023 BUDGET TOWN HALLS
THIS Saturday, July 30th from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM Truman College, 1145 W. Wilson, is hosting a Budget Engagement Forum. More information can be found here. These events will be live-streamed on chicago.gov/live. ASL interpreting will be provided. Please email communityengagement@cityofchicago.org with request for additional language interpretation.

NATIONAL NIGHT OUT
Tuesday, August 2nd from 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM. Gallagher Way, 3635 N Clark.


SHRED-A-THON
Saturday, August 20th from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM or until the truck is full. Clarendon Park Fieldhouse, 4501 N Clarendon.
DEVELOPMENT & CONSTRUCTION UPDATES
CLARK STREET CROSSROADS
The goal of the Clark Street Crossroads process is to develop a unified vision that will guide future investment and public realm improvements along this corridor. If you were not able to attend the latest public meeting meeting, share your thoughts and priorities by completing the survey here.

DEVELOPMENT NEWS
AFFORDABLE RENTAL UNITS IN NEW DEVELOPMENTS
If you have questions on any of these projects or other work taking place in the 46th Ward please reach out to our office at 
ward46@cityofchicago.org or 773-878-4646. When asking about developments or construction work, it is helpful to have the address of where the proposal or work is taking place.

4701 N. CLARK
Developer Platinum Homes is requesting a zoning change from B3-2 to B2-3 in order to construct a five-story residential building. The proposal would have 38 dwelling units (29 two-bedroom, 2 bath units and 9 two-bedroom, 1 bath units with parking for 21 vehicles and 62 bicycles. The Department of Planning and Development has not yet provided final approval for the design, and more feedback is needed from Clark Street Block Club and Uptown United before going forward. Because the proposal is under $10M, it will not go before the full 46th Ward Zoning & Development Committee. This development proposal is along Clark Street, which is currently undergoing a retail corridor study led by the Chicago Department of Planning and Development, which is why this department's input is also crucial. Click here for more information.

4642 N. MAGNOLIA
Developer Finan Development, Corp is requesting a zoning change from RS-3 to RT-4 in order to build a 6-unit residential building on a double lot. On July 14, Ald. Cappleman met with Magnolia-Malden Neighbors Block Club and the developer.  Ald. Cappleman is now waiting for a letter from the local block club leadership before he makes his final decision about this project. 

4555 N. DOVER 
In response to a requirement for a 50' setback on Dover, the developer will increase the density of his proposal in order to meet the demands of his lender for a loan. Once a plan has been submitted, Ald. Cappleman will host a meeting with Dover Street Neighbors and the developer to discuss this proposal. After community input has been obtained, Ald. Cappleman will provide his decision on whether or not to approve an upzone.

WE WILL CHICAGO
Review and learn more about Chicago's first citywide planning initiative since 1966 here.  Provide feedback through the survey here.

MENU FUND & INFRASTRUCTURE UPDATE 
The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 150 strike against Lehigh Hanson, Vulcan Materials, and Lafarge Holcim has ended. CDOT is now working on a new schedule for the remainder of the construction season and we will provide scheduling updates as we receive them. 

CTA & RED PURPLE LINE MODERNIZATION (RPM) UPDATES

If you have questions, comments, or concerns about the RPM project please contact RPM@transitchicago.com or call 331-303-2499. 

RPM CONSTRUCTION NOTICES
Work continuing Thursday, July 28th through Wednesday, August 31st.



AUGUST SCHEDULE
JOB LISTINGS & COMMUNITY RESOURCES
Find up-to-date job listings here, and find more information about employment & volunteer resources here. 

DFSS RAP EXTENSION 
The Chicago Department of Family Support Services shared an update on their Rental Assistance Program (RAP), a fund for all Chicagoans who are at risk of becoming homeless due to loss of income or other eligible emergency which prevents them from paying rent. The RAP deadline has now been extended and can be applied for on the DFSS website at  http://chicago.gov/fss/RAP  . Click here for FAQs on the eligibility for the RAP program. DFSS is processing applications on an ongoing basis and working to process applications to help connect people with their RAP services. You can also visit the DFSS North Area Community Center, 845 W Wilson Ave, open Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, to file your application in person. 


CREATIVE PLACE PROGRAM
The Together We Heal Creative Place program application deadline has been extended to July 29th at 5:00 PM to accommodate additional proposal submissions taking place in community areas identified through the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH)’s expansion of trauma informed centers of care across the city. 


CLEAR PATH RELIEF
The Clear Path Relief Pilot Program (CPR) is designed to help low-income motorists eliminate old debt by requiring payment of only the original fine amount on tickets issued within the last 3 years. Additionally, any new tickets will have 50% ​of the amount due waived if paid ​in a timely​ manner and will not incur any fees or penalties until after December 31, 2023. Motorists are eligible if they have a household income less than or equal to 300% of the 2022 Federal Poverty Guidelines or are currently enrolled in Utility Billing Relief. Additional details on the benefits, eligibility, and application for CPR can be found here.

ARGYLE NIGHT MARKET VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY  
Back for its 8th year, the Argyle Night Market will run every Thursday between July 7th and August 25th from 5:00 PM -9:00 PM.  This market features local vendors, delicious treats, and multi-cultural entertainment right in the heart of Uptown’s Asian Marketplace – Argyle Street (between Kenmore & Sheridan)! Part market, part street festival, this vibrant event is located on the city’s first shared street in Chicago. Two shifts per night are available for all volunteer duties (5:00 PM -7:00 PM and 7:00 PM -9:00 PM). Click here to sign up.

ARGYLE NIGHT MARKET VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Uptown United Booth - volunteers will pass out info about the neighborhood and assist with t-shirt sales
Beer Garden - volunteers will be partnered up with a staff member who is BASSET certified to serve alcohol.  
Greeters - volunteers will stand near the entrances to the market greeting guests and counting attendees.

CARE FOR REAL
Care for Real is facing a 332% increase in first-time pantry visits. More neighbors are experiencing food insecurity for the first time. When one couple who have supported Care for Real for more than 20 years learned about the surge in need, they we were inspired to act. Together, we set a $33,200 goal to help us feed more neighbors this summer. The couple will match the first $15,000 to double the impact of gifts from neighbors like you this month. We need your support today. Double your impact and give now.


LEGAL PROTECTION FUND
The Haitian American Museum of Chicago (HAMOC) is the newest partner of the Legal Protection Fund (LPF) Community Navigator Program and the National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC). HAMOC will be holding various programs around the city on topics like Know Your Rights and Unauthorized Practice of Law. Additionally, HAMOC can refer people in need of legal support to NIJC for a FREE consultation for the following services:
  • Removal (deportation) proceedings
  • Family-based immigration
  • DACA renewals
  • Protection based immigration (U visa, T visa, VAWA, Special Immigrant Juvenile Status, Asylum)
  • Naturalization/Citizenship
  • Renewal of green cards
  • Temporary Protected Status

Contact HAMOC at 773-213-1869 or info@hamoc.org for more details.

BICYCLE UPDATES
BIKE GIVEAWAY
Free bikes for eligible residents, find more information here.


CLARK STREET COMPLETE STREET IMPROVEMENTS

Our office hosted a virtual meeting to present the plans for protected bike lanes and in-lane bus boarding along Clark street from Irving Park and Montrose. You can find a recording of the presentation along with the improvement plan here. If you have questions or comments about this plan that you would like to share with the Chicago Department of Transportation, please email cdotbikes@cityofchicago.org

PUBLIC SAFETY 
HEAT SAFETY: COOLING CENTER OPTIONS 
COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTERS
Cooling areas at Chicago’s Department of Family and Support Services six community service centers are activated when the City’s emergency response plan is in place or as conditions warrant. When online, cooling centers operate from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Mondays – Fridays. The nearest Community Service Center located in the 46th Ward is the Northside Community Service Center located at 845 W. Wilson Ave. Chicago, IL 60640 which can be reached at 312-744-2580. 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN THE 46TH WARD
Utilizing Chicago Public Library facilities is another way to beat the heat during extreme temperatures. 46th Ward residents are welcome to utilize the Bezazian Library branch at 1226 W. Ainslie Street which can be reached via phone at 312-744-0019. More information on their hours of operation can be found on their website here. 
Uptown Library branch at  929 W Buena Ave which can be reached via phone at 312- 744-8400. More information can be found here.

SENIOR CENTERS
Senior residents of the 46th Ward who are looking to beat the heat are encouraged to visit any of the Department of Family and Support Services Senior Center locations. 
Northeast (Levy) Senior Center
2019 W. Lawrence Avenue
Chicago, IL 60625
312.744.0784(voice)
Edgewater Satellite Senior Center
5917 N. Broadway 60660
312.742.5323
Monday through Friday
8:30 – 4:30


WELL-BEING CHECKS
City resources and plans are more impactful with the support of every Chicagoan. We all should make a special effort to check on friends and neighbors during heat waves, especially older adults, young children, and residents with special needs. If you are unable to make contact, you can request a well-being check by downloading the CHI311 app, visiting 311.chicago.gov, or calling 3-1-1.

OEMC LAKEFRONT/BEACH SAFETY
City of Chicago beaches are now open! The Chicago Park District urges patrons to enjoy the beaches safely and responsibly and look for “No Swimming Allowed” signage that indicates that swimming is not sanctioned in that area. Visitors should consult the district’s website or social media platforms to ensure water conditions are safe for swimming before heading out to the beach and only enter the water when a lifeguard is on duty. Swim hours are 11:00 AM to 7:00 PM, daily, Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day. Click here to learn about safety tips to enjoy the Lakefront safely.

HOME & BUSINESS PROTECTION PROGRAM
If you live in or operate a business in Chicago you can now apply to receive reimbursement for your security cameras and other security devices.  Since the offer is "first-come, first serve," we encourage people who want to buy cameras to do so now. Learn more here.


PUBLIC SAFETY TIPS & INFORMATION 
For more public safety tips, including how to make a 911 call, please visit the public safety page on our website


BIKE SAFETY & COOK COUNTY BIKE PLAN
If you see a parked car in the bike lane please call 911 to report this traffic violation, this is essential in boosting cyclist safety in 46th Ward. Click here to view the Cook County Bike Plan where you will find various resources and a survey.

UPDATES ON THE LATEST COMMUNITY ALERTS
Click here for more up-to-date information on the latest community alerts. If you have any questions about past crimes, please contact the 19th District CAPS Office at 312-744-0064 or the 20th District CAPS Office at 312-742-8770.

THE CITY'S PLAN TO ADDRESS CRIMINAL ACTIVITY
The Chicago Police Department's website provides detailed information about current crime statistics as well as an outline of their plan to address violence. Click here to view that information.


19th DISTRICT (south of Lawrence)
P: 312-744-0064
E: CAPS019District@chicagopolice.org
See the Beat Meeting listing below for the Zoom meeting I.D. number and passcode.


20th DISTRICT (north of Lawrence)
P: 312-744-8714
E: CAPS020District@chicagopolice.org
Click here to join a 20th District CAPS meeting.

Copyright © 2022, All rights reserved.

4544 N Broadway Ave, Chicago IL 60640
Hours: Monday - Friday from 9am - 5pm
Phone: 773-878-4646
Email: Ward46@cityofchicago.org

Website: james46.org


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