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Week 1: Tuesday, June 16
Pick Up: 4:30 – 7:30PM
257 West 88th Street


This Week's Share List

Full Share
Romaine, 1 head
Tuscan Kale, 1 bunch
(also known as Lacinato or Dinosaur)
BokChoy, 1 large head
Spinach, 8 oz
Basil, 1 bunch
Red Leaf lettuce, 1 head
Spring Onion, 1 bunch
French Breakfast Radish, 1 bunch

Partial Share
Romaine, 1 head
Tuscan Kale, 1 bunch
(also known as Lacinato or Dinosaur)
BokChoy, 1 large head
Spinach, 5 oz
Red Leaf lettuce, 1 head
Basil, 1 bunch

Fruit Share
1 quart + 2 pints organic strawberries

Other Shares
Egg 
Butter 

Letter from the Farm

We’ve been preparing for this day since January, when we placed the first of many seed orders for the season.

In February, our 21-page annual organic certification application was submitted and a 2 tons of potting soil had been neatly stacked in the snow outside one of the greenhouses. We were full on starting seed in the greenhouses by mid-March, in spite of this winter’s frigid grip. Plants had to be started.

Once our field crew moved into their seasonal housing on the farm in mid-April and a tight choreography of busy-ness began. Just like the farm, plants grow according to a specific seasonal schedule. For instance, there’s no such thing as a Northeast tomato in June, without the assistance of furnaces running 24-7. But we don’t expect our CSA members to know this. It helps if you do. That way you understand why it may feel like you’re being put through a greens’ diet cleanse these first couple of weeks(!).

We’ve found a handy chart from foodstalk.com for your reference that explains what grows when: 

We hope it helps. We’re excited to be growing for you.
 
-- Ken, Maryellen, Alis & Xavier 
Distribution Volunteers
1st Shift, 4-6PM
Supervisor:

Judith Trachtenberg and Renie Rutchick
 
Veronika Sikorski
Esther Bedolla
Alaethia Doctor
Miranda Hammer
Maya Haasz
Liz Lasky
2nd Shift, 6-8PM
Supervisor:

Susan Miller
 
 
Alaethia Doctor
Marian Getzler-Kramer
Liz Lasky
Sara Greenberg
Recipes
Crispy Kale
Serves four

 
Roasting kale until it’s shatter crisp is one way to coax finicky eaters into enjoying this highly nutritious green. Children and adults alike eat them as if they’re chips. Serve as an appetizer, snack or with a meal.

Tip: To quickly remove the stem from a kale leaf, wrap your hand around the stem at the base of the leaf. Firmly hold the stem with your other hand as you run your wrapped hand up towards the leaf tip, quickly stripping the leafy portion from the stem. Discard or compost the stems.

 
1 bunch of kale from this week’s share, washed
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons cider vinegar
Kosher salt

Heat the oven to 350° F. Meanwhile, strip the kale leaves from the stems (see tip, above). Tear the leaves into large, bite-size pieces. Thoroughly dry in a salad spinner. Transfer onto a clean kitchen towel and blot just to make sure the kale is dry.

Mound the kale on a heavy-duty, rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with the olive oil and cider vinegar and toss with your hands to evenly coat the leaves. Bake in the oven, turning the leaves once they’ve begun to crisp, after about 10 minutes. Rotate the baking sheet and continue to cook until crackly crisp but not browned, 8 to 12 more minutes. Do not let the leaves turn brown; they’ll taste burnt and bitter. Remove from oven, sprinkle with salt and serve.

 
FROM THE FARM HOUSE!


Strawberry Shortcake is a cinch if you make the biscuits with heavy cream instead of cold butter. We like to mash some of the berries with a little sugar and then fold in with sliced berries. For the topping, beat 1 cup cream with 1 tablespoon sugar in a chilled bowl until cream develops soft peaks. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla extract and continue to beat to barely stiff peaks.

Strawberries and Cream Biscuits
 

Strawberry Basil Seltzer
 

Pot Stickers with Bok Choy
This recipe calls for ground pork, but it would be delicious without it.

Spicy Noodles with Bok Choy
This recipe wisely calls for cooking the thicker root end of the bok choy separately from the leafy tops since they cook at a different rate. This is another recipe that would work just as beautifully without the meat. 

 
Copyright © 2015 B'nai Jeshurun CSA, All rights reserved.


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