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MIT Technology Review
This Week in Technology Review
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Everything you need to know about the technology topics you care most about, delivered to your inbox each week.
Week of November 26
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Business Impact
These charts show how Asia is dominating industrial-robot adoption
Europe and America have far fewer robot workers than we might expect them to have.
Connectivity
Companies fed up with crappy Wi-Fi are deploying 5G instead
Automakers, oil companies, and shipping ports plan to build private 5G networks for faster, more reliable connectivity.
Intelligent Machines
Making AI algorithms crazy fast using chips powered by light
Optical chips have been tried before—but the rise of deep learning may offer an opportunity to succeed where others have failed.
Can you make an AI that isn’t ableist?
IBM researcher Shari Trewin on why bias against disability is much harder to squash than discrimination based on gender or race.
Uber has cracked two classic ’80s video games by giving an AI algorithm a new type of memory
An algorithm that remembers previous explorations in Montezuma’s Revenge and Pitfall! could make computers and robots better at learning how to succeed in the real world.
Rewriting Life
Rogue Chinese CRISPR scientist cited US report as his green light
An expert finding from the National Academies of Sciences was He Jiankui’s excuse to edit the DNA of two babies.
The Chinese scientist who claims he made CRISPR babies is under investigation
He Jiankui says he created twin girls whose genes were edited to make them resistant to HIV. Was that ethical? Or even legal?
CRISPR inventor Feng Zhang calls for moratorium on gene-edited babies
A leading scientist wants Chinese researchers to halt a project to create genetically modified children.
EXCLUSIVE: Chinese scientists are creating CRISPR babies
A daring effort is under way to create the first children whose DNA has been tailored using gene editing.
Sustainable Energy
Climate change’s highest cost: Overheated employees too miserable to work
The US economy could lose $221 billion annually by 2090 as people stop working as much or as hard.
Cutting emissions could prevent tens of thousands of heat deaths annually
And that’s just in the United States.
Seaweed could make cows burp less methane and cut their carbon hoofprint
A diet supplemented with red algae could lessen the huge amounts of greenhouse gases emitted by cows and sheep, if we can just figure out how to grow enough.
Popular this week
Amazon is launching pay-as-you-go cloud computing in space
EXCLUSIVE: Chinese scientists are creating CRISPR babies
A daring effort is under way to create the first children whose DNA has been tailored using gene editing.
The Chinese scientist who claims he made CRISPR babies is under investigation
He Jiankui says he created twin girls whose genes were edited to make them resistant to HIV. Was that ethical? Or even legal?
CRISPR inventor Feng Zhang calls for moratorium on gene-edited babies
A leading scientist wants Chinese researchers to halt a project to create genetically modified children.
This is the first good picture from NASA’s InSight probe after it landed on Mars
NASA is braced for “seven minutes of terror” as its InSight probe prepares to land on Mars
An electric plane with no moving parts has made its first flight
The turbineless design uses electroaerodynamic propulsion to fly and could herald the arrival of quieter, lower-emission aircraft.
What is machine learning? We drew you another flowchart
It pretty much runs the world.
Uber has cracked two classic ’80s video games by giving an AI algorithm a new type of memory
An algorithm that remembers previous explorations in Montezuma’s Revenge and Pitfall! could make computers and robots better at learning how to succeed in the real world.
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