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This month's newsletter discusses:
  • Are your supplements safe?
  • Boost productivity & health
  • Key micronutrients for building muscle
  • Make your own probiotics!
  • Watch Livia Ly, learn about her philosophy and Nutrily
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Are Your Supplements Safe?

 

Do you take any supplements? If you are into nutrition you probably do or have at some point in your life. Until a few years ago, only weight trainers would consume supplements. Now, people who are worried about their health and wellness, in general, are all current consumers. According to the website Nutraingredients-usa.com, the size of the U.S. supplement industry is almost $40 billion.
 
But, there's a problem. Thanks to Clinton in 1994, a law was signed and everything changed. Before 1994, dietary supplements were subject to the same regulatory requirements as were other foods. This law left the responsibility of supplement regulation to the companies themselves. So, if I make a supplement, I am the only person responsible for ensuring that it actually contains what I am saying that it contains on the label, or that it is safe, effective, and so forth.
 
On October 15, 2015, there was a release of an article where researchers analyzed data from 63 emergency departments in the U.S. from 2004 through 2013 to describe visits because of adverse events related to dietary supplements. They calculated an average of about 23,000 emergency room visits for adverse events associated with dietary supplements annually and further estimated that these visits would result in an average of 2,154 hospitalizations annually. Twenty-eight percent of those emergency department visits involved young adults. After the exclusion of unsupervised ingestion by children, weight-loss products were implicated in a quarter of those emergency department visits.

Don't get me wrong. I am pro supplements and recommend them to my clients on an individual basis regularly.  But, the intake of a supplement has to be carefully monitored. Brands, compositions, amounts, safety, effectiveness, interactions, and length for administration are all factors that have to be well studied. Health professionals must watch for side effects, and of course, positive results. Most of the time, clients will just need to add or eliminate specific foods to resolve their problems without the need for supplements.
 
The government's agency, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), released a note after the publication of this article as follows:

 

 "NCCIH has had a longstanding commitment to build the base of objective evidence on the safety and efficacy of natural products, including supplements. We work hard to examine whether they work, and if so, how they work... NCCIH’s role is to conduct scientific research—this includes identifying the bioactive substances in supplements affecting human cells, organs, the immune system, and the brain as well as research on interactions. We also provide objective, evidence-based information to help people make informed decisions about using complementary approaches... Remember, “natural” does not always mean safe, and if a product’s claims seem too good to be true, they probably are." 

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November Nutrition Tips 

Boost Productivity & Health


Techniques to Save Time, Rev Up Your Energy, and Finally Have Time for You

“Find time to be healthy and have a work-life balance?” When I suggest this idea to some of my clients, following are common phrases I hear on a regular basis: “There’s never enough time,” “I don’t have time to eat healthy,” or “I don’t have time to cook.” It’s always about time.

But what if I tell you that there are some tools and techniques that you can follow to boost productivity that actually work, giving you that extra, needed time to devote to your health? First, let’s deal with the all-important
overhaulofyourpossibly time-wasting, energy-draining current schedule, so that you can then move on to having more opportunity to spend on healthy habits.

Productivity Techniques to Work into Your Busy Routine

Read more...

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The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) is the only non-profit academic society dedicated to promoting the science and application of evidence-based sports nutrition and supplementation. 

Join amazing professionals at the 13th Annual ISSN Conference and Expo - Clearwater Beach FL - June 9-11, 2016 
Woman loses it at the ISSN Conference

 

Key Micronutrients for Building Muscle



You are a weight trainer and you eat adequate amounts of carbs, protein and fat. You also take supplements, sleep well, rest enough, train hard, and change your training periodically. But still, it seems like you’ve hit a plateau trying to build more muscle.

There could be multiple reasons for this, but one that I’m particularly interested in is a deficiency of micronutrients.

There is no point in having a high calorie / protein diet if your body is lacking key nutrients that are crucial for specific reactions to form extra muscle cells. Some of these nutrients are needed for amino acid metabolism, others are indirectly related because they increase insulin sensitivity, which promotes muscle building through a pathway called the mTOR Signaling Pathway. Ok, enough of the geeky stuff, let’s take a look at a list of vitamins and minerals to take into consideration and check for possible deficiencies, so you can have meal plans created by your dietitian that are right for you.

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November Recipe

Make Your Own Probiotics!



Probiotics feed your healthy gut bacteria. If you missed my newsletter on gut health, read it here

 
If yogurt is the only probiotic food you're eating, then you're missing out on a whole lot of healthy fermented foods out there. Fermented foods contain 100 times more probiotics than a supplement.

Many traditional cultures have been fermenting their own foods throughout history, initially as a preservation method, a way to preserve the harvest of summer well into the dark days of winter, but later as a cultural habit and taste preferences. Even those tropical and equatorial populations who had no need to preserve food still fermented at least some of their foods.  


 
 
How to Ferment Vegetables


1. Choose your fermentation equipment.
You can use 
glass Tupperware with airtight lids, or mason jars.

2. Prepare the vegetables for fermenting.
You may shred, chop, slice, or leave it whole.  

3. What do you need to add to start creating probiotics on your vegetable?
A fermented food recipe may call specifically for salt, 
salt and whey, or a starter culture.  Also, use filtered water to prepare the brine.

4. 
Weigh the vegetables down under the brine.
Once the vegetables have been prepared and placed in the chosen fermentation vessel, weigh the vegetables down under the brine, keeping them in an anaerobic environment during the fermentation period.  So you can avoid mold growth.

5. Move the fermented vegetables to cold storage.
Once the vegetables are finished culturing under a warm temperature, it’s time to move them to the fridge.

 
 

RECIPES
 


Level 1                                                                                                 Picture by Fermented Food Lab
Simple Grated Zucchini Kraut
  
Ingredients
Zucchinis
Sea salt

Instructions
  1. Grate the zucchini with a box grater or the grating attachment on a food processor. Pack about 1/2 cup into a quart jar. Sprinkle lightly with salt. Repeat the 1/2 cup grated zucchini and sea salt until you reach 1-1/2 inches from the top of the jar.
  2. Place a lid on the jar and allow to ferment for 2 to 5 days, depending on the temperature. Be sure to burp your jar every day by simply unscrewing the lid slightly and allowing the gas to escape. 
 
 
Level 2                                                                                                      Picture by Shared Appetite
Pickled Onions
  
Ingredients
2 tbsp. sea salt
4 cups water
3-4 cups pearl onions, peeled or 2-3 onions, thinly sliced
 
Instructions
  1. To prepare brine, dissolve salt in water.
  2. Place the onions in the jar and pour brine over onions, leaving 1-2 inches headspace.
  3. If necessary, weigh onions down under the brine to keep them submerged.
  4. Cover the jar with a tight lid, airlock lid, or coffee filter secured with a rubber band.
  5. Culture at room temperature (60-70°F is preferred) until desired flavor and texture are achieved. If using a tight lid, burp daily to release excess pressure.
  6. Once the onions are finished, put a tight lid on the jar and move to cold storage.
Makes 1 quart
 
Level 3                                                                                                     Picture by Harmonious Belly
Lacto-Fermented Butternut Squash With Sage
  
Ingredients
2 pounds butternut squash
2 tbsp. fresh sage leaves (about 12-15 leaves)
2 tbsp. sea salt
Filtered or spring water
 
Instructions
  1. Using a large, sharp knife, cut the stem end and bottom from the squash. Set the squash on a stable cutting surface and cut off the outer peel with the knife. Save one piece of the peel. This will act as a starter. Cut the squash in half and remove the seeds and fibers from the center.
  2. Chop the squash into 1-inch cubes and place in the fermenting jar. Include the saved piece of peel from the last step. Add the remaining ingredients and shake to mix. Press weights on top of the squash to keep them submerged.
  3. Allow to ferment for at least 1 week at room temperature. Ferment longer for softer, stronger tasting squash. 

 
Level 4                                                                                                     Picture by Harmonious Belly
Naturally Cultured Beets
  
Ingredients
10 medium or 3 large beets, cooked, skins removed, chopped or shredded
3/4 cup water
One of the following:
    - 1 tbsp. salt or
    - 2 to 3 tsp. salt and 1/4 cup whey
 
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the salt in water then add the whey (optional)
  2. Place the beets in the jar and pour the liquid over the beets. Ideally the beets should be submerged under the liquid. Ferment for 3 to 10 days at room temperature.
  3. Once the fermentation period is complete, the beets can be removed to a storage container if desired. Store cultured beets in the refrigerator or root cellar.
Makes approximately one quart.
                                                                                                                                                                 Picture by Huffington Post
Make your own kefir
Milk kefir grains are live active cultures consisting of yeast and bacteria existing in a symbiotic relationship. Adding the kefir grains to fresh milk yields a delicious probiotic drink in about 24 hours. Milk kefir can be enjoyed plain, flavored, or used in many recipes. Purchase and start this culture here.



 
Liked this topic? Then here you’ll find more information. 

Adapted from Cultures for Health
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This newsletter was created and designed by Livia Ly, MS, RD, LDN

 

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