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RAP NEWSLETTER  //  No. 013  //  March 29, 2019


WHAT'S INSIDE


  • Featured Events: Jails and Justice, Suzanne Lacey retrospective!
  • Calendar: FOSTER screening, Lackawanna Blues, and more!
  • Art On View: Dinh Q. Lê, Roski Students at LACE and Charlie James Gallery!
  • RAP Playlist: Listen to the songs we selected this year!
Welcome to the thirteenth edition of the RAP Newsletter, an occasional publication from RAP USC, an interdisciplinary collaborative funded by the Provost at the University of Southern California researching the intersection of race, arts, and placemaking. For more information about us visit the RAP Website and to submit newsletter items for inclusion email us. —The Editors

FEATURED EVENTS


JAILS AND JUSTICE: RETHINKING PUBLIC SAFETY THROUGH THE ARTS
TUES, APR 16 @ 7PM
Location: California African American Museum

Jails and Justice brings together an alliance of artists and activists to showcase two new works exploring incarceration and racism in the United States, amplifying a critical public conversation on the road towards the historic Reform L.A. Jails 2020 ballot initiative. Bringing together performers from Black Lives Matter Los Angeles (BLMLA) and USC’s Institute for Theatre and Social Change (ITSC), this event will premiere a new theatrical work directed by acclaimed actress and activist Gina Belafonte. The work is inspired by previous spontaneous performances that BLMLA and ITSC collaboratively presented on public transit around LA County. Alongside them, an artists’ collective comprised of USC students from the Kaufman School of Dance and the School of Architecture will present an interactive performance and installation for JusticeLA’s ongoing Jail Bed Drop. Presented by Visions and Voices

SUZANNE LACY: WE ARE HERE
APRIL 20 – AUG 4
Location: SFMOMA AND YBCA

Co-organized by SFMOMA and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Suzanne Lacy: We Are Here is the first full retrospective of the Los Angeles–based artist and RAP/Roski faculty Suzanne Lacy. At SFMOMA, visitors can explore Lacy’s entire career, from her earliest feminist work to her latest immersive video installations. The YBCA presentation offers a new, experimental approach to authorship and participation, revisiting key collaborative projects through the lens of today. This includes an in-depth focus on The Oakland Projects (1991–2001), a series on youth empowerment, media education and policy.


CALENDAR


THURS, APR 4 @ 7PM  //  POETS, PRIESTS, MARTYRS: HENRY DUMAS, JOSEPH JARMAN, MLK
The Black Radical tradition carries a legacy of artist-driven utopian visions that have taken the form of free schools, collectives, and informal think tanks wherein black artists of all genres across the diaspora endeavored to take control of knowledge production. Presented on the anniversary of the assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this workshop marks the first in a series of collaborations between MOCA and writer and artist Harmony Holiday titled “Black Exile.” The event opens with a moving work by drummer Max Roach made in King’s honor.

FRI, APR 5 @ 7PM  //  FOSTER
Oscar-winning filmmakers Mark Jonathan Harris and Deborah Oppenheimer new film FOSTER documents the largest county foster-care system in the nation through five moving and illuminating stories that provide an inside look at the LA County Department of Children and Family Services. Visions and Voices is sponsoring a screening of FOSTER and a thoughtful panel discussion with the filmmakers, a social worker who grew up in foster care, and faculty from the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work and the Keck School of Medicine, reflecting on the problems and possibilities of the foster care system today.

SAT, APR 6  //  BLACK VISION
A comprehensive new report from the USC Race and Equity Center documents that overall Black students do not feel supported at universities. When students are living with intersectional identities, like Blackness and Queerness, it can be even harder to find support. Towards addressing this gap, sponsors including groups from USC, UCLA, UCI, are hosting a conference to value the thoughts, ideas, contributions and lives of Black queer students in an academic space. The conference will consist of workshops, networking, an art component, and a keynote speech by Prof. Ericka Hart of Columbia University.  To register for this conference, fill out this form. The conference will be held in the Social Science Plaza at UCI campus from 10AM-5PM. For more information contact Amber Gordon, blackvisionconference@gmail.com.

SAT, APR 13 @ 1-9 PM  //  WE SPOKE: A DURATIONAL READING EVENT
WE SPOKE is a durational reading event featuring 38 wordmakers,. This event is an invitation to the melting point of past connections and present transformations, and the unfolding of community.  

WED, APR 17 @ 7PM  //  LACKAWANNA BLUES
A magical, musical, and deeply personal work written and performed by Tony Award–winner Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Lackawanna Blues is a reminiscence of his 1950s childhood in a small town on the banks of Lake Erie. Santiago-Hudson takes on more than 20 colorful characters—from would-be philosophers and petty hustlers to lost souls and abandoned lovers—in celebration of the eccentric boarding house he grew up in. Santiago-Hudson returns to his roots in this tour de force performance with live blues music performed by composer Bill Sims Jr.


ART ON VIEW


Closing APR 7  //  DINH Q. LÊ: TRUE JOURNEY IS RETURN
SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART
The largest solo exhibition in the United States in more than a decade of the work of internationally-renowned artist Dinh Q. Lê, this exhibition of five major video and photography installations entwines rarely heard narratives of war and migration from people in North Vietnam, the Vietnamese diaspora, and refugees who, like Lê, have returned to live in their home country. 



MAR 30 – MAY 11 //  TINSELWOOD
LAXART
As with her other documentaries, French director Marie Voignier explores her middle class background and the baggage of inherited colonialism in her 2017 film Tinselwood. Set in Cameroon, Tinselwood is grounded in formalism. that “bring out the botanical aspects in great detail” while focusing on the exploitation of a country and its resources by Europeans and more recently Asians.


APR 3 - MAY 25 / /  UNRAVELING COLLECTIVE FORMS
LACE
A quipu (Quechua term) is a device made of colored knotted threads—a multisensory ancient Andean language. Quipus are vanished narratives of resistance that inspire this exhibition and programming. Unraveling Collective Forms is an exercise of identifying diverse voices and their common threads, patterns, and processes, as well as their differences. Featuring work by Roski MFA Patrisse Cullors.


APR 6 - MAY 4  //  TELL ME A STORY AND I’LL SING YOU A SONG

CHARLIE JAMES GALLERY
This exhibition showcases a group of artists whose practices are invested in the phenomenological exploration of narrative and the ways in which the personal intersects and complicates the historical record. Through painting, sculpture, photography, mixed media, and installation, these artists explore the nuance and tension that exists between personal histories and dominant historical narratives. Curated by Roski MA in Curatorial Practice Bianca Moran and featuring work by Roski MFAs Star Montana, noé olivas, and Dulce Soledad Ibarra.


 

APR 13 - JULY 20  //  EDGAR FABIÁN FRÍAS; PERPETUAL FLOWERING
VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM
Edgar Fabián Frías' irst solo museum exhibition transforms the gallery into a multi-disciplinary offering/sanctuary/portal, mixing video testimonials, digital imagery, flower essences, and interactive elements to create an environment that encourages contemplation as well as altered states of awareness. Perpetual Flowering foregrounds the importance of self care, creating community, and ways in which we may hold space for each other. Collectively, Fabián Frías’s works create an environment conducive to empathy and understanding, and one that reflects an intersection of various sectors the artist engages with, including art practice, community organizing, therapy, ceremony, healing practices, and spirituality rooted in the sacred knowledge of their indigenous heritage.


RAP PLAYLIST


Each year the RAP faculty assemble a Spotify playlist to share. It's part of how we seek to be full human beings in academia and comment on the times. Popular music critic and RAP PI Josh Kun also created two large compilation playlists for our 2017 conference Forward LA: Race, Arts, and Inclusive Placemaking after the 1992 Civil Unrest.  We hope you enjoy them!
ANNETTE KIM
“This is America” by Childish Gambino

The amazing intermingling of different rhythms, the lyrics are genius and of course the video.
FRANCILLE WILSON
“I Am Not My Hair” by India.Arie

This wonderful song rejects external simplistic judgements about women and asserts self definition and self determination in a playful yet profound manner.
TAJ FRAZIER
“The Ballot or the Bullet (Malcom X) by Wolfy Funk Project and “Niger Delta Blues” by BANTU, Tony Allen
SUZANNE LACY
“Natural Women” by Aretha Franklin

Just watched her Kennedy Center performance, super moving.
DAVID SLOANE
“What's Going On” by Marvin Gaye

Remains a signature for me as I try to make my way through the contentious and conflicted days of our lives. 
LISA SCHWEITZER
“We Beg Your Pardon” by Gil Scott-Heron

 
VICTOR JONES
“Mo Money Mo Problems” by The Notorious B.I.G
“Caroline” by MC Solaar

 
EDWIN HILL
“Vocab! p (Prélude)” by Hocus Pocus
“Free Your Mind Radio Advert” and “Cosmic Slop” by Funkadelic
“Mes 2 amours” by MC Jean Gab
“Après l’automne” by Kalash

 
LANITA JACOBS
“The Line" by D'Angelo

The Line – D’Angelo Sometimes, we need a mantra through dark times so we can see them as the incubators of change they are; D’Angelo provides that in “The Line.
”Tryin’ Times by Dwight Trible
Trible tells it like it is with winks and right-time groans; he is a jewel in LA and his songs soar with melancholic resonance and soulful optimism.
"A Place Where Love Is" by Andy Bey
Bey’svoice is a stand-alone, and his song makes you believe not only in love, but your capacity to actualize it at a time when sincerity matters and can even change some things.
JODY ARMOUR
“Fuck tha Police” by N.W.A.

Ice Cube’s profane and unvarnished critique of the police is still powerful today
NAO BUSTAMONTE
“Feeling Good" by Nina Simone

“Birds flying high, you know how I feel…” This is a song about connectivity to the earth and feeling hopeful. Nothing compares to the power and emotion in Simone’s voice.
BONUS TRACK:
“Tints" by Anderson .Paak (feat. Kendrick Lamar)

local artist, Paak’s back story, old school rhythms + Kendrick!
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