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Bulletin 14                               July - October | 2017

PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE IACHR

On September 6, 2017, Red ANA, together with other civil society organizations, participated in the 164th Extraordinary Period of Sessions of the IACHR at the public hearing “Legal and Judicial Process for the Recognition of Refugees, Stateless Persons, and Beneficiaries of Complementary Protections in the Americas.”At the hearing, Red ANA presented the relevant developments in the Americas regarding the adoption of procedures for the determination and identification of the stateless population. Additionally, Red ANA highlighted the obstacles that exist to achieve the implementation of such procedures, as only four countries have a solid legal framework for the determination of statelessness statues: Mexico (2007), Costa Rica (2016), Ecuador (2017) and Brazil (2017). Watch the video of the hearing here.
GLOBAL COMPACT ON MIGRATION

On October 5th and 6th, Red ANA attended the Latin American Regional Consultation of Civil Society, focusing on the Global Compact on Migration in Quito, Ecuador. This event was one of the seven regional consultations promoted by the International Organization for Migration (ION), established in the resolution for the Global Compact on Migration. These consultations have the common objective of promoting the participation of civil society, who act as indispensable actors to advocate for migrants in the elaboration of public policies on human mobility, as well as to integrate diverse perspectives for the elaboration of the Global Compact. Learn more about the Global Compact on Migration here.
STATELESSNESS IN THE UNITED STATES

On October 19th, Red ANA participated in an event organized by UNHCR and the Centro de Estudios sobre Migraciones (CMS). The event brought together academic experts, government representatives from the United States and the United Nations, human rights and statelessness experts as well as stateless persons to discuss statelessness in the United States and the importance of collecting data on this population in the country.
NEW STATELESSNESS PUBLICATIONS

Recently, UNHCR published ‘Technical Fact sheets on the Inter-American System of Human Rights and the Protection of UNHCR’s Persons of Concern.’ The fact sheets address the technicalities of the rights established in the American Convention on Human Rights and the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man and connects them to the International Law on Refugees and Statelessness and UNHCR’s pronouncements on these matters. They also include state’s obligations in matters of prevention and internal forced displacement and the protection of its victims. The factsheets can be found here.

Data Collection on Stateless Persons in Canada, conducted by the Canadian Center for Statelessness is now available. This report follows the 2017 UNHCR report on statelessness in Canada. Data collection is essential to understand the full scope of the problem of statelessness; therefore, the report focuses on the practices of the key Canadian institutions responsible for the collection of data on this population.

The report, “Dreams Deferred: The struggle of Dominicans of Haitian descent to get their nationality back,” by the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Foundation, the American Jewish World Service, and the United Nations Democracy Fund describes, as stated by CEDESO, the journey of those affected by sentence 168/13. You can find the report here.


Statelessness in the Caribbean: The Paradox of Belonging in a Postnational World by Kristy A Belton and published by University of Pennsylvania Press, analyzes statelessness and its various challenges in the region. Without citizenship from any country, more than 10 million people around the world cannot enjoy the rights, freedoms and protections that citizens of a state often take for granted. They are stateless and formally do not belong anywhere. Stateless persons generally face insurmountable obstacles in their ability to be self-determining agents and are vulnerable to a variety of damages, including abandonment and exploitation. Through an analysis of statelessness in the Caribbean, Kristy A. Belton defends the conceptualization of statelessness as a form of forced displacement. Find this book and buy it here.

JOIN RED ANA

Contact Red ANA to participate in our panels and conferences, research and drafting, receive information and updates about statelessness and collaborate with us in the future. Become a member!
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