Copy
November 2015
Issue 2
View this email in your browser
Welcome to the PreK-12 Instruction Snapshot, a monthly newsletter for all teachers supporting students with disabilities on the general education/core curriculum.
In this Issue:

1) Instructional Updates
  • How Can We Help Our Students Become Tech-Savvy?
  • Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
2)  Autism Support
3)  Positive Behavior Support
4)  Transition Services

5)  Upcoming Trainings

How Can We Help Our Students

Become Tech-Savvy?

Computer skills have become increasingly important to our everyday lives. Students have the option of completing tasks, writing, and doing math on the computer at school and at home. Helping students learn to navigate a computer is one of the basic skills they need to complete computer-based tasks.

One of the most challenging initial tasks students face in becoming tech-savvy is keyboarding. Hunting for keys can take up valuable time and make it difficult to complete tasks quickly.

Here are a few suggestions for FREE, online resources that can be utilized to help students with their keyboarding skills.

Want to help your kids identify the letters on a keyboard?

Keyboard Climber provides students a fun way to recognize the letters on a keyboard.  Once the student completes a level, they automatically move on to the next. 

http://www.tvokids.com/games/keyboardclimber


Key Seeker is an interactive learning tool to help young students find the letters on the keyboard and the correct hand used to strike the keys.

http://www.annrymer.com/keyseeker/


Want to help students practice their typing skills?

This website offers students an opportunity to practice and refine their typing skills.  They will also receive an instant overview snapshot of their results of how many words per minute they can type.

http://www.powertyping.com/qwerty/lessonsq.html
 
Want to focus on lessons from keyboarding practice to the basics of computer skills?

Macmillan/McGraw-Hill's Treasures online computer literacy lessons are engaging activities for students at all levels. These resources offer content designed to help teachers save time and keep students motivated and focused on the basics of computer literacy.

http://activities.macmillanmh.com/reading/treasures/stories/teachcls.html
 

What is Universal Design for Learning?


Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework for instruction with a set of principles that guide the effective design and development of curriculum to reach all students.  It is designed to provide all students with equal opportunities to learn. UDL provides a blueprint for designing goals, methods, materials, and assessments to reduce barriers in learning for students with varying skills and abilities.  UDL practices focus on:

  •        Recognizing that students possess different skills, experiences, and learning styles. 
  •        Emphasizing flexible and tailored curricula. 
  •        Utilizing multiple ways of presenting content, engaging students, and assessing comprehension.


Click the image above to visit the website for CAST.org to learn more about the UDL guidelines.


Principles of Universal Design for Learning

There are three principles in Universal Design for Learning.  Principle 1 is to support recognition learning, provide multiple means of representation– that is, offer flexible ways to present what we teach and learn.  Principle 2 is to support strategic learning, provide multiple means of action and expression– that is, flexible options for how we learn and express what we know.  Principle 3 is to support affective learning, provide multiple means of engagement– that is, flexible options for generating and sustaining motivation, the why of learning  (UDL in the Classroom, 2012).
 
Visit http://www.cast.org/ to learn more about Universal Design for Learning.
 

Building Social Skills Through Games

We know that students with autism face challenges in the area of social skills, but we do not always know what to do about it. How can you continue to teach the content for which you are responsible, while adding yet another set of lessons into the day?  Social skills can be incorporated into what you already do.  For example, when the students have earned “free” time, you can introduce games to be played.  You can use board games, or you can play group games that are often completely new to these students.  Do not just hand out a game and expect the students to know what is expected of them. 




Prime the students before the activity:  “We are going to play some games together.  This is an opportunity for you to practice some skills that I know you already have, such as listening to directions, and taking turns.  We also get to demonstrate some new skills, such as being a good sport, and saying encouraging things to one another. This isn’t about winning: it’s about having fun with your classmates.” 

Take the time to engage in structured games with your students:  Initially, they will need coaching and monitoring so that they can be successful.  After the session concludes, debrief with a short statement:  “Wow, I saw a whole lot of skills being demonstrated during the games.  I saw students agree to play something that might not have been their first choice.  I saw turn-taking, good-sportsmanship, and patience.”  By taking the time to turn “free time” into “social skills instruction and practice,” your students will slowly build their social awareness and management skills. 

Madison Middle School teacher Melissa Strahan-Diaz primes her students for success with a video featuring her own class.  Her students are building skills each week as they play games along with typical peers from Louis Tapia’s college prep class. This video demonstrates peer-mediated instruction, video modeling, and the use of social stories:  a combination of three evidence-based practices.
 
Click the image above to watch social skills instruction and practice in action!
This Bulletin will give you guidelines for using a multi-tiered framework for implementing behavior instruction and intervention.

Click the image or the link above to open Bulletin 6269.0.

 
Behavior Support for YOU!

These behavior support flipbooks are available for you online. Click the images to open the flipbooks in your browser.
 
        




Visit the Positive Behavior Support page to learn about Tier 1, 2, and 3 strategies and access resources and District Policies and Procedures.

http://achieve.lausd.net/page/4137
 
Transition services are federally mandated services that help students with disabilities prepare for adult life. Transition services include employment preparation, exploring education and training options after high school, living independently and any skills students need to be successful as adults. Our District starts writing Individual Transition Plans (ITP) in IEPs beginning at age 14, but it is never too early for students to start building independence and self advocacy skills they will need to be successful as adults. Here are some ideas:

1.  Encourage participation of your students in their annual IEPs. Perhaps students can attend a small portion of the meeting and introduce the team. Team members might share something positive about the student at the outset of the IEP. The end goal is for students to feel comfortable discussing their disability as well as their strengths and needs so that they can advocate for themselves in adulthood.

2.  Introduce students to a wide variety of careers and educational options. Often students are only aware of jobs that they see on TV. Encourage them to talk to adults in their life about what they like and don’t like about work. Bring in a guest speaker with an interesting job. Read an article about an unusual career.

3.  Help students see the similarities between the classroom and the workplace. Today’s employers expect students who are problem solvers, collaborators and creative thinkers.  Consider providing your students with opportunities to engage in project-based learning and solving real-world problems.
 
We look forward to bringing you more transition tips next month!
 
New Common Core-Aligned Goal Bank

NOW Available in Welligent!
Best Practices in IEP Writing and Implementing CCSS-Aligned IEP Goals



New Session Added!

A new session has been opened for this class on Thursday, January 7, 2016, at Commonwealth Elementary School.

You can sign up on Learning Zone for Best Practices in IEP Writing and Implementing CCSS-Aligned IEP GoalsVisit Learning Zone and type in the Keyword: IEP Writing to find classes.

 
Upon completion, participants will receive six hours of compensation at the training rate ($25.00 per hour) for attendance.

There is still room left in the Salary Point Classes for November and December!

 
Class Title Date(s) Location(s) Time Learning Zone Keyword(s)
Simple Strategies for Responding to Behaviors  Thursday,
 November 5, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS  4:00 pm - 
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Simple Strategies
Lorne Street ES
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
Step by Step of Behavior Support  Thursday,
 November 12, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS  4:00 pm -
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Step by Step
Lorne Street ES
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
The Subject We Forgot: Social Emotional Learning  Thursday,
 November 19, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS  4:00 pm -
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Subject We Forgot
Lorne Street ES
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
Diffusing Disruptive Behavior  Thursday,
 December 3, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS  4:00 pm -
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Diffusing
Lorne Street ES
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
Alternatives to Suspension  Thursday,
 December 10, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS  4:00 pm -
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Alternatives
Lorne Street ES
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
Supporting Students in Crisis  Thursday,
 December 17, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS  4:00 pm -
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Supporting Students
Lorne Street ES
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
Academic Conversations: Supporting English Learners with Disabilities  Saturday,
 November 7, 2015
Robert Hill Lane Elementary   8:00 am -
 3:00 pm
Keyword: Academic Conversations
 Saturday,
 December 5, 2015

Word Study for Students in the Emergent, Letter Name- Alphabetic, and Within Word Stages
 
 Thursday,
 November 19, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS
 
 4:00 pm -
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Word Study
 Thursday,
 December 3, 2015
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
Evidence-Based Practice: Video Modeling  Thursday,
 November 5, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS  4:00 pm -
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Video Modeling
 Thursday,
 November 12, 2015
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
Evidence-Based Practice: Self-Management  Thursday,
 November 5, 2015
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center
 
 4:00 pm - 
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Self-Management
 Thursday,
 November 12, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS
Reading Assessment and Intervention  Thursday,
 November 19, 2015
Sellery Sp.Ed. Center  4:00 pm - 
 6:00 pm
Keyword: Reading Assessment
 Thursday,
 December 3, 2015
Johnnie Cochran MS
 
Co-Teaching at the Secondary Level – 2 Parts (8 hours total)
 
 2 Saturdays-
 November 7 & 21, 
 2015
Robert Hill Lane Elementary  8:00 am – 
 12:30 pm 
 both days
Keyword: Co-Teaching
 2 Saturdays-
 December 5 & 12,
 2015

Instructional and Participatory Practices for Students with Severe Disabilities
in General Education Classes
 
 November 7, 2015 Robert Hill Lane Elementary  8:00 am - 
 11:00 am
Keyword: Participatory Practices
 December 5, 2015

Integration Electives in Elementary and Secondary Settings
 
 November 7, 2015 Robert Hill Lane Elementary  11:30 am -
 2:30 pm
Keyword: Integration
 
 December 5, 2015

School Staff Ability Awareness Training
 
 November 21, 2015 Robert Hill Lane Elementary  8:00 am -
 12:30 pm
Keyword: Ability Awareness
 December 12, 2015
 
Salary Point Classes
Audience:  These workshops are available for Special and General Education Teachers. Please visit Learning Zone for class descriptions.
Compensation: There is no monetary compensation for salary point classes. Participants will be given a certificate of attendance.  Participants must stay for the entire duration of the class to receive a certificate for the workshop hours. Upon collecting 30 hours, participants can submit the certificates to the Salary Allocation Unit with a NA form to petition for one salary point. Please note that LAUSD SELPA Charter School Staff are welcome, but are not eligible for the salary point.
 
Division of Special Education
Los Angeles Unified School District
 
PreK-12 Instruction Snapshot Archive

Need Additional Assistance?
Contact:  Rachael Sawyer Perkins at  rsawyer@lausd.net

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

The agencies and organizations that appear on this page do not constitute an endorsement of the Los Angeles Unified School District, Division of Special Education; nor, should an exclusion of other websites be considered intentional. This page serves to provide awareness to students, teachers, and parents of additional information and services.

The opinions expressed on these pages are solely those of the host website and not necessarily those of the Los Angeles Unified School District, Division of Special Education. Any advertising presented on these pages is solely the responsibility of the host website and not the Los Angeles Unified School District. Additionally, references, links, products or services displayed by the websites are not to be considered endorsements of the Los Angeles Unified School District.